mining


Peruvian State Protects Mining Company Instead of Citizens: Interview with Mario Tabra Guerrero

Today, while those in power wage a campaign of media disinformation to prepare the scene for the 2011 presidential elections, peasant communities of Ayabaca, Piura continue to fight multinational mining corporations. With government support, these companies continue to explore for and exploit mineral deposits, ignoring residents’ concerns about the environment and the water supply.


Shareholders Goldcorp oppose the company's strategy in Guatemala

Two Breaking the Silence (BTS) members and actual shareholders of Goldcorp sent the company a resolution for presentation at the Annual General Meeting of Goldcorp May 19th in Toronto. Goldcorp still has to decide whether it will allow this to be presented. We invite you to read the resolution (.doc, 86 KB).
 

Guatemala: organizations demand end to mining operations

Several peasant, indigenous and environmentalist organizations from Guatemala are demanding the government to comply with a resolution of the International Labour Organization to immediately suspend some of the mining activities carried out by Cementos Progreso and Montana Exploradora in Guatemala.

Read more:  http://radiomundoreal.fm/Immediate-Suspension


Copper in the Clouds

Oxfam International launched 2 movies on the planned Río Blanco mining project in Northern Peru, focussing on the possible environmental impact of the project and human rights violations.

 


Peru: Mining Co's Making a Mint, Tax Free

LIMA, Feb 1, 2010 (IPS) - Experts and activists in Peru complain that while mining corporations are cashing in on soaring metals prices, they continue to enjoy exemption from royalties and corporate taxes, if they reinvest their profits.


[Photo essay] Someone Else’s Treasure - Guatemala

Allan Lissner is an independent documentary photographer based in Canada. Home to seventy-five percent of the world’s mining companies, Canada leads the way in the global mining industry. But people the world over are raising complaints describing the industry as Canada’s number one contribution to global injustice. Complaints include the displacement of indigenous communities, families being torn apart, destroyed livelihoods, ruined ecosystems, and the erosion of ancient indigenous cultures.


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